Dog Vaccines

Core vaccines are highly recommended and/or mandatory for all dogs. Non-core vaccines are optional vaccines that should be considered in light of the exposure risk of the animal.

Core Vaccines

Rabies

Rabies is a serious, contagious, fatal disease of animals and humans. Because of the deadly nature of the disease, vaccination of dogs and cats is required by law. Dogs 12 weeks and older can receive this vaccine. A booster is required one year later, and thereafter rabies vaccination should be performed every three years. See more information on rabies on the American Veterinary Medical Association website.

Distemper / Hepatitis / Parvo / Parainfluenza (DHPP)

This vaccine protects dogs against distemper virus, hepatitis, parainfluenza and parvovirus. Puppies can given their DHPP vaccines as young as six weeks old and the vaccine needs to be repeated every two to four weeks with the final booster being given no sooner than 16 weeks of age. For dogs older than 16 weeks of age, two doses of the vaccine given two to four weeks apart are recommended. This vaccine is good for one year once the boosters are complete. See more information on canine distemper and canine parvovirus on the American Veterinary Medical Association website.

Leptospirosis

Leptospirosis is spread through the urine of wildlife. The disease can be fatal or have high morbidity and also has zoonotic potential which means it can be contracted by humans. The initial vaccination should be given no earlier then 12 weeks of age, followed by a booster two to four weeks later. See more information on leptospirosis on the American Veterinary Medical Association website.

Non-Core Vaccines

Bordetella

The Bordetella vaccine protects pets from kennel cough, which is an upper respiratory infection. The intranasal vaccine is recommended for puppies and previously unvaccinated dogs since one dose will protect them for one year. If a previously unvaccinated dog is receiving the injectable form of this vaccine, then it should be followed by a booster two to four weeks later before being good for one year once the booster is complete.

Lyme

Lyme disease is contracted from the bite of a tick infected. The deer tick is the common vector for Lyme disease. Dogs that spend time outdoors in areas where ticks are common are at risk for Lyme disease and should be vaccinated. The initial vaccination should be given no earlier than nine weeks of age, followed by a booster two to four weeks later. See more information on Lyme disease on the American Veterinary Medical Association website.

Canine Influenza Virus (CIV)

The Canine Influenza virus causes upper respiratory signs including a cough, nasal discharge and a low-grade fever. Some dogs can experience more severe symptoms. It is highly recommended for dogs that travel or will be kept in boarding facilities. The initial vaccination should be given no earlier than seven weeks of age, followed by a booster two to four weeks later. See more information on CIV on the American Veterinary Medical Association website.

Additional Information

Please consult your veterinarian to see which vaccines would be appropriate for your pet.